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Hibernia Platform
Oil Rig Photos
No: 107   Contributor: Garve Scott-Lodge   Year: 2005   Country: Canada
Hibernia Platform

Off the coast of Newfoundland, the Hibernia is the world's largest oil platform in terms of weight, at a total of 1.2 million tonnes. This consists of a 37,000 tonnes integrated topsides facility mounted on a 600,000 tonne gravity base structure along with 450,000 tonnes of solid ballast which was added to secure it in place.

Inside the gravity base structure are storage tanks for 1.3 million bbl of crude oil. The shape of the base is intended to prevent damage by icebergs.
Picture added on 07 November 2006
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Hibernia Platform
add commentComments:
Hello. A few years ago there was a documentary shown on TV regarding the construction and deployment of the Hibernia oil rig to its final resting place and I haven't been able to find any information on where I can get a copy of that documentary. Does anyone have any information that would point me in the right direction of where to locate this video? If you do I would sure appreciate you letting me know. Thank you,
Tom

Added by Tom Lacy on 05 December 2008.
The programme was shown on the Discovey Channel.
Their web site might be a starting point.

Added by Paul Green on 09 December 2008.
Thank you. I'll check with them and see if they know anything about it.

Added by Tom Lacy on 15 March 2009.
www.channel4.com has a documentary about icebergs which includes some film of the Hibernia.

Added by Sam on 07 August 2009.
The show: Super STructures: Hibernia
Found on : Hulu.com
Season 1 Episode 8

Added by Ron on 14 February 2010.
I was on the tow out crew. Saw the camera crew there but did not pay any attention to them. Turns out I'm in frame for almost 2 seconds... I'm now famous thanks for the link to the documentary.

Added by Richard Barnes on 03 February 2011.
That must have been exciting to be a part of something like that. I think I need to get your autograph :0 thanks for writing. I sure would like to get a copy of that documentary somewhere. I guess I'll luck out sooner or later. Anyone who hasn't watched that should do themselves a favor and do so. Its really something to watch come together.
Thanks again

Added by Tom Lacy on 04 February 2011.
I was on that monster in 2005, it is huge. Nice people and nice culture.

Added by Joao Lemos on 17 February 2011.
I worked on the super structure from start to finish, I also went offshore and secured it to the ocean bottom with 450,000 tonnes of solid ballast which was pumped from tankers. The waves were high and the weather was bad but I really enjoyed it, it was something i'll never forget.

Added by Bren Lewis on 07 April 2011.
I worked on the construction of the GBS from Decrmber 1994 to August 1996. Matteo Guliano, Ed Beresford and I were the 3 Shift Leaders with any where from 300 to 1200 workers under our charge during this time.
Witnessing the GBS grow from 9.2 meters to 111 meters in height was an awesome experience that I am proud to have been part of.
Norm Heersink
Plano, Texas

Added by Norm Heersink on 21 May 2011.
Back in 1996 I carried out risk analysis of the tow to field and installation of the Hibernia platform. I spent a few days in the camp in Mosquito Cove and made a few photos of the GBS and the topsides which I will attach if I find out how! [Editor: Hi Vladimir, click the Upload a Picture link at the top of the page.]

Added by Vladimir Trbojevic on 28 May 2011.
I have been on this project from before the tow out to the present, almost 15 yrs later. Feb. 2003 we had a storm that scared most individuals off the coast of NL. The winds peaked at 139 mph with a rogue wave striking us underneath the topsides ( approxo 250 ft above water ) that rocked the rig back and forth slowly for aprox. 7 seconds. It was a frightening event that I will never forget.

Before this took place I was nervous about the bigger storms that we would encounter offshore, but not any more.
I would like to personally thank all the Engineers and the workers, where ever you are, for building the rig strong enough to get me home everytime to my family.

Added by Rob Dean on 27 November 2011.
This must be wrong. Isn't Gullfaks C in the North Sea the largest oilplatform ever buildt, and the largest structure ever moved by man?

Added by Stein Henta on 21 January 2013.
i would to share this photo in my fb account

Added by Drito Visto Gamas on 21 November 2013.
I worked on the design of Hibernia in France at Doris Engineering in Paris then St Johns Newfoundland in 1991-93. in the early days just before construction started at Bull Arm. Was also on site at Bull Arm for some time. Long time ago, but great project working alongside some great people....sully

Added by on 16 March 2017.
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