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Claymore Platform
Oil Rig Photos
No: 85   Contributor: Garve Scott-Lodge   Companies: Talisman   Year: 1997   Country: United Kingdom
Claymore Platform

The Claymore Platform in the North Sea is now owned by Talisman. It is in fact two platforms, one for accommodation and one for drilling and processing. picture #86 shows the accommodation side.
Picture added on 30 October 2006
add commentComments:
Wow what more can I say, what a awesome picture. It must be amazing to be on the rig or even get close to it.

Added by ReD on 11 September 2008.
This was were I began my offshore career May 1989, hated it!
Almost 20 years on were am I... still gainfully employed offshore.
Made some great friends during this time.

Added by Karl Bailey on 13 November 2008.
Key Karl, I just noticed you left a comment - it's Denise here. By the way I loved it on there.

Added by Denise Macdonald on 16 November 2008.
Done about a dozen or so trips to the Claymore, accomodation side is pretty good, production platform could do with tarting up a bit! :-)

Added by Dave on 30 November 2008.
I was on the Claymore in 1991, and it was a total dump, which it probably still is. It was the rust that was holding the thing together!! Lesson's have obviously been learned with the arrival of the seperate accommodation module!!

Added by Ronny Watson on 27 February 2009.
I hope it's not rust that's holding the Claymore together as my husband works there and I would not like to think that it is any more dangerous than it has to be!

Added by Moejo on 29 April 2009.
The production platform is old and a bit rusty (the slogan "step up for Safety" on the bridge link ought to read "step back to the past") but the CAP is fine... Before I was sent there, I asked around and got two sets of answers: those there before the early 90's hated, those after the accomdation platform was installed said it was fine.

Still the food's better on Clyde!

Added by Nic on 23 August 2009.
Worked as a Roughneck and Derrickman on the Claymore back in 84 - Taffy Jones or Sandy the crain driver still around? Give me a shout.

Added by Gary Manock on 22 November 2009.
Oh my go this picure brings back so many memories, this was my very first experience of time offshore but not on the platform - I used to work on the standby ship that use to support it. She was called the Cam Ranger before they got taken over by Viking... I was at the Claymore way back in 1993, the platform had a man overboard off the south west flare boom on wed 15th Dec 93, a date I will never forget his name was willie and he lived in Greenock..... it was a tough day but one we all learned from.... best regards to all who still work off shore. After I left Viking I went onto the Royal Fleet Auxiliary and became a deck officer. I did this for 7 more years before I decided to move to Australia.... I no longer work offshore as I broke my back in three places, but hey we still have the memories to all those who wait for your loved ones, your are so dedicated and deserve a medal for waiting for us for all that time but they will be home and the wait is worth it take care.

Added by Stewart Taylor, formerly Stewart Kirby on 23 May 2010.
As others have said, what memories. Was barely 18 when I flew out for the first time, and remembering "what the hell have I got myself into?". I was on Bawden rig 41 from 79-81 (the other rig was rig 40). Many a good memory of rough weather, hard work, rowdy weeks in Aberdeen, and attempts to kill my liver. The good ol' days. Must have liked it, still in the oilfield today. Thanks for keeping my alive back them Oxy/Bawden.

Added by Darren Hussey on 20 July 2010.
I removed the old mandolite PFP from the blast walls etc what a rust bucket, dodgy rig.

Added by Garry Beech on 13 September 2010.
On the original hook up in 1976-78 lived on Viking Piper. Worked for Malcolm and Allen/James Scott. Anybody out there who was around at that time?

Added by Mike Beck, on 09 December 2010.
I worked for James Scott for 23 years. Claymore was my first trip offshore in October 1976 and I discovered I liked the life. This is the platform where my knowledge of arc welders and plant maintenance was first used by Scott's supervision and ever after I was always used as TL, plantman and welding spark on hookups. As such, I was a bit of a hybrid, not really a part of Scott's work crews nor the main contractors either. Still, I made some good friends here who I often worked with on different platforms over the next 23 years. The kind of lads it was ALWAYS a pleasure to see again. Cant remember much of the day to day routines though. Must have been content to be there though 'cos I stayed for 3 years. If anybody remembers the Sedco accomodation barge being hurriedly withdrawn from the field, it was down to me!! Long winded story, but one day the barge lecky hadn't turned up for his trip so the barge engineer (in a previous incarnation I had been a marine spark) asked me to investigate duff insulation readings on the pod motors. I was decommissioning the temporary accomodation on the barge at the time prior to the barge leaving the field at the end of its contract. Me and Stan Ramsey went down to the drive pod, entered it by torchlight and stepped into 6 inches of water above the top walkway. To anybody who knows about these things, I should have been able to descend 20 feet to the bottom of the pod. Panic stations when I told the engineer. He immediately sent his own engineering crew to inspect this and the other 3 pods and they found another 2 pods totally flooded!! The barge hadn't moved under its power for about 2 years up to this time, and obviously had never been inspected for along time. The barge was almost immediately taken under tow, with me still aboard, to Peterhead (3 day stormy tow) where it was berthed ready to have the flooded pods lifted out. Eventually, a 15ton mobile crane (got wrecked in the process) assembled an 120 ton crawler crane on the mole to lift out the flooded pods. Went to bed that night, got up in the a.m. wandered outside and asked where the 120ton crane was. Couldn't believe it when I was told that it had overbalanced when trying to lift the first pod out of the pontoon, and finshed up on the the bottom in 90 feet of water. Apparantley, the engineer who was given the task of pod removal hadn't taken into account the weight of the flood water contained within the pod. I've had some funny experiences like this one, so odd in fact, that sometimes they sound to be too fantastic to be true. But TRUE, they certainly are. Dunno about you lot, but I love to hear this kind of reminiscence. Maybe later!!

Added by Alan Clark. (oilslick) on 24 December 2010.
A further word on this story of the flooded drive pods. See picture #1021 for a couple of thruster pods already removed from another Sedco 700 series barge.

Added by Alan Clark on 04 January 2011.
See also picture #823 for another and better view of pod removal. Can't be many folk have actually seen this.

Added by Alan Clark on 07 January 2011.
I'm researching for a story. Can anyone tell me, what is the accommodation like? Spacious, pokey? How long is that walkway? It looks terrifying. How high above sea is it? It's hard to tell from the pictures. What is it like in rough weather? You can email me with your stories if you like. All will be treated with confidence, I just want to put my readers 'out there'. Thank you so much.

Added by Jillian on 05 April 2011.
I would like to say a BIG THANK YOU to everyone on the Claymore for donating to my daughters trust fund (www.oliviastory.co.uk) I hope someone from there sees this as I don't have an email address to pass it on. Very appreciated and I would like to pass on my thanks. If someone could do this for me, i'd be very grateful.
Mike

Added by Mike Story on 29 July 2011.
This has been passed on to the guys on the Claymore. From the operators and process engineer on night shift.

Added by H Coleman on 14 August 2011.
Worked there 2001 - brilliant job, ill health forced retirement.

Added by Lawrie Duff on 23 August 2011.
I can remember working on here as a welding inspector for about 18mths in 80, 81 ish. we put in new fire water piping I think. What I do recall is the amazing food that one of the head cooks used to prepare. Apparently he also had a restaurant in Middlesborough and he used us as guinea pigs .... Beef Wellington on a Sunday, suckling pig at Christmas .. great stuff, and a'la carte at lunch and dinner. But when the wind blew from the North and the turbine exhaust went under the rig and it wasn't pleasant working on the 68ft level.

Added by Peter Usher on 08 February 2012.
I worked on Claymore platform in 2001 and 2002 for Rigblast as part of the team demolishing the old living accommodation. The amount of porn found whilst demolishing the sleeping cabins was unreal!

Added by Scott Blackburn on 02 April 2012.
I was on the Claymore for the hook up in 1976 for over a year. it was the start of a long career in the oil and gas offshore industry all around the world.

Added by Bob Adams on 27 July 2012.
This brings back memories, not all good.. I was on the Claymore from 1987 until 1996 working for AOC, we used to live on the Tharos or the numerous other accomodation flotels that took their turn for our hotel. I travelled back out 3 days after the Piper blew up, I did not sleep much that first night in my bunk, think I heard every creak and groan the rig made, sad days. As a previous contributor said the accomodation on the CAP was much better and made life easier.

Added by Steve Girven on 17 January 2013.
I worked on The Claymore from 88 to 94 with AOC. Lots of good mates and Laughs. Jimmy Jack, Derek Donnelly etc----

Added by Dougie Keddie on 30 June 2014.
HI..I WORKED ON THE CLAYMORE PLATFORM 1976/1999 DURING THE HOOK UP AND THE VISIT FROM PRINCE CHARLES AND ARMAND HAMMER [OXY TOP MAN ]I WAS ABOARD THE SEDCO 704 ON THE STORM EXTENDED TOW INTO PETERHEAD AND ACTUALLY SAW THE CRANE FALL INTO THE HARBOUR ..I WORKED WITH SELTRUST OFFSHORE SERVICES [JACK GRANTS CRAZY CREW ] YES THEY WERE GOOD OLD DAYS // A MAJOR MEMORY IN MY LIFE ..MADE REAL GOOD FRIENDS ..NOW PAST MY 80TH BIRTHDAY ..HOPE ALL THOSE LADS ARE IN GOOD HEALTH AS I AM , , ,

Added by BRIAN PARR on 10 June 2015.
I was on the Claymore several times. Before and after the CAP was added. Brother in Law Archie 'crystal chandelier' was onboard for years.

Added by Brian Wyllie on 05 July 2015.
Worked on the claymore 76-79 scaffolding fore man, made some great friends still in touch with some of them, retired now after 32 years offshore, worked all over the world, had a great life.

Added by Roger wells on 08 July 2015.
I worked on the claymore October 76- 79 as scaffolding fore man, hard but great times, most of the Degroot men came from East anglia long days 15 hrs a day 21days on 10 days off , lived on the secco 704 it was the pits but the crack was good

Added by Roger wells on 08 July 2015.
HI/ GLAD TO SEE THE CLAYMORE RESURRECTED ON " OILRIG PHOTOS " I REMEMBER WELL ..ROGER WELLS HIS SIDEKICK BARRIE / PAT MC CANN [RIP] /GEOFF GATLEY/ AND LAWRIE WELDING INSPECTOR ..AND AND THE ELECTRICIANS FROM NORWICH [SOME OF WHOM DIED IN PIPER ALPHA DISASTER] I LIVED IN LOWESTOFT SO WE ALL KNEW EACH OTHER AS WE TRAVELLED TO ABERDEEN ON THE SAME PLANE ..I AM SURE MOST WILL REMEMBER THE //BARGESAFE ACCOMODATION CAPSULES // WE SLEPT IN AT FIRST [AND GOT PAID AN EXTRA £90 A WEEK FOR DOING SO .THE BUNKS WERE SO CLOSE IF YOU PUT YOUR ARM OUT IT WAS IN THE BUNK OF THE GUY ACROSS FROM YOU ..YOU HAD A SEAWATER SHOWER FOR WHICH YOU HAD TO SIT ON THE TOILET SEAT ..BUT AS ROGER SAYS .THE CRACK WAS GREAT ..SO WAS THE FOOD ..ALSO THE NUMBER OF DAYS WE WERE CAMPED OUT IN THE DOUGLAS HOTEL IN ABERDEEN WAITING TO GO OFFSHORE .NORFOLK.SUFFOLK .GEORDIES, , SCOUSERS .AND ME IRISH YOU COULD GUARANTEE THE CRACK WAS GOOD
I REMEMBER THE "FIRST OIL UP" EVERYONE ON BOARD WAS PRESENTED WITH A LITTLE BOTTLE OF "FIRST DAY OIL" I STILL HAVE IT WE HAD BILLY SMART / PADDY MINNIS AND STEVE SCOTT .ADMINISTRATION AND HELIDECK ..I REMEMBER THE BOMB SCARE WHEN THE ROYAL NAVY SHIP CIRCLED THE RIG ALL DAY.
I HAVE SO MANY MEMORIES OF THE CLAYMORE AND THE PEOPLE ..A WONDERFUL LIFE EXPERIENCE.GRATEFUL FOR THEM ALL..SORRY I CANT LOCATE A PICTURE I HAD OF ROGER AND BARRIE HANGING ON A SCAFFOLD CONSTRUCTION "T PIECE " UNDER THE HELIDECK EXTENSION [ A LONG WAY DOWN TO THE WATER ] HOPE TO SEE MORE MEMORABLE CONTRIBUTIONS ON THIS FORUM ..BRIAN


Added by BRIAN PARR on 10 July 2015.
Who is in-charge at the Claymore rig right now?

Added by Aby on 06 May 2016.
Brian Parr, I was on Claymore 77/80 also Sedco 704 as H L O. The crack was sound grub great on viking piper laybarge. Still a few Granth's Tigers still here in Morecambe. All the best Brian Pip Ruskin.
P

Added by on 24 July 2016.
JS/MA as well. First in WPPS Wallsend, then offshore for the hook-up. No HUET or anything remotely like it in those days, offshore recruitment at Scotties consisted of one of the gaffers rapping a spoon on the table in the bait cabin and announcing ... 'Who wants to go offshore?" "Ok, be at the Central Station under the Big Clock at 11 on Saturday morning"



Added by MoJoe Werkin on 29 August 2016.
I was a Hydrographic Surveyor with UDI, Denmore Road, Aberdeen 1985/86 and undertook 3 or 4 survey jobs on Claymore during that time. I remember once being billeted in a 4 berth cabin with 2 guys on night shift & 1 on day shift.....I can't say my presence was appreciated at any point! It was operated by Occidental at the time.

Added by Clinton Johnson on 22 September 2016.
13/03/77 I started with Occidental Petroleum as an electrical tech on Claymore . Brown and Root did the design / jacket , King Wilkinson were the project management and Seltrust Offshore , SOS were the main contractor . James Scott were the electrical contractors.


Added by Alex Stirling on 13 March 2017.
Not one but TWO chapters on the Claymore Hook Up in my latest book in the 'From Jarrow to ...' series.

Including details my very first 'Billy Pugh' flight.

The structure looked huge from our perspective at sea-level, after days of inactivity I couldn’t wait to get started, finally we got the go ahead to get onboard and start lighting the thing up. For obvious safety reasons, no one but our team was supposed to start work until we had completed our initial tasks, temporary lighting of the main access points and walkways. We were left in no doubt whatsoever that everyone would be depending on us and clearly understood the importance and urgency of our mission, and at this point I was introduced to Billy.

Billy Pugh, the generic name for personnel transportation baskets utilized throughout the world in the offshore construction and exploration industry. A truncated cone with a large circular base connected by sail ship style rope rigging to a smaller ring at he top end which is attached to two wires one for lifting, the other a safety device. This is then lifted into an upright position by a crane, after strapping on a lifejacket, the idea is to step onto the outside of the lower ring facing in over and cross your arms in front of you through the rigging then hang on to the ropes. The crane then whisks the device up to deposit the “riders”, usually four, onto a flat area either on the production platform or drilling rig floor. Normally platform or rig cranes carry out this activity, but as neither of the platform cranes on our project were commissioned yet, one of the cranes on the heavy lift barge was used. As the operator was at a much lower location than the platform decks he had to over-compensate and lift the basket to a much higher level than was necessary, even though he was guided by a rigger, with a radio of course. No amusement park white knuckle ride can come anywhere near the stark terror or match the adrenaline rush induced by being suspended ten stories in the air by a 20mm wire with nothing else but your own iron grip and desire to survive keeping you there.

In later years I would sometimes do as many as ten transfers a day depending on conditions and needs, jumping on and off baskets without even thinking about it, but I can assure you, my first meeting with Billy and I did not think much of him at all.



Added by MoJoe Werkin on 20 March 2017.
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